oidc-agent
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Detailed Information About All Options
General Options:
Options for specifying information on the command line:

--accounts

Using this option oidc-gen will print out a list of all configured account configurations. Configured means that they are saved on the system and can be loaded with oidc-add; it does not mean that they are currently loaded. This option is the same as oidc-add --list. To show a list of the accounts that are currently loaded use oidc-add --loaded.

--codeExchange

When using the authorization code flow the user has to authenticate against the OpenID Provider in a web browser and is then redirected back to the application. To be able to catch that redirect oidc-agent usually starts a small webserver. If something goes wrong during the redirect (because the web server crashed or no web server was used (--no-webserver)) the user can still finish the account configuration generation process. In such a case the suer must copy the url he is redirected to from its browser and pass it to oidc-gen --codeExchange. Then oidc-gen should be able to obtain and save the final account configuration.
Note that while this option also works for edu.kit.data.oid-cagent:/ redirect uris, it might not be possible to obtain the uri the user is redirected to from the browser.

--confirm-default

When specifying this option all confirmation/consent prompts are automatically answered with the default value. This option is useful when you want to use oidc-gen non-interactive.
Examples for confirmation prompts are:
  • When creating a new account configuration using dynamic client registration and the process is not finished but the client already registered and the process is started again it is possible to reuse the already registered client. In that case oidc-gen asks to use the temporary stored data. (Default: yes)
  • When deleting an account configuration, oidc-gen asks if you are sure. (Default: no)
  • When deleting an account configuration that used dynamic client registration, oidc-gen asks to delete the client at the provider. (Default: yes)
  • When deleting an account configuration, the associated refresh token will be automatically deleted. In case this is not possible, oidc-gen asks if it should continue or not. (Default: no)

--confirm-no

When specifying this option all confirmation/consent prompts are automatically declined. This option is useful when you want to use oidc-gen non-interactive.
For examples for confirmation prompts, see --confirm-default.

--confirm-yes

When specifying this option all confirmation/consent prompts are automatically answered with yes. This option is useful when you want to use oidc-gen non-interactive.
For examples for confirmation prompts, see --confirm-default.

--cp

This option allows the user to change the CA bundle file that is used to verify SSL/TLS certificates. A user must use this option when oidc-gen cannot automatically find a proper CA bundle file (e.g. non default location). A user can also use this option to provide a more restricted bundle file that only contains the certificates needed for a specific provider.

--delete

This option will delete the account configuration for the specified shortname. It will also revoke the used refresh token and optionally delete the OIDC client (not implemented yet).

--file

Can be used if the client was registered manually. Most OpenID Provider allow downloading the client configuration as a json file (or copy the JSON config). Such a file can be used to reduce the amount of information passed to oidc-gen. The argument should be the absolute path to a file containing the JSON formatted client configuration. oidc-gen then reads the client configuration from this file, so that the user does not have to enter all information manually.
Because this option is only used when a client was registered manually, it implicitly sets the --manual option.

--flow

Depending on the OpenID Provider a user can use multiple OpenID/OAuth2 flows to obtain a refresh token. oidc-agent uses the Refresh Flow to obtain additional access token. Therefore a refresh token is required which can be obtained in multiple ways. The --flow flag can be used to enforce usage of a specific flow or to prioritise a flow over another. oidc-agent will try all flows in the following order until one succeeds:
  1. 1.
    Refresh Flow
  2. 2.
    Password Flow
  3. 3.
    Authorization Code Flow
  4. 4.
    Device Flow
Possible values for the --flow option are: 'refresh', 'password', 'code', and 'device'. The flag can also be used if multiple flows should be tried, but in a different order than the default one. To do so provide the option multiple times with one value per option in the desired order.
In the following we will describe the different flows:

Out Of Band

If a user obtained a refresh token out of band he can directly provide it to oidc-gen using the --rt option. The --flow=refresh option is then implicitly set.
Note: Refresh tokens are bound to a specific client id. The provided refresh token must be issued for the provided client id.
Obtaining a valid refresh token for the specific client id is out of scope of this documentation. We recommend one of the following flows.

Password Flow

Most OIDPs do not support this flow. One provider that supports the password flow is INDIGO IAM, for additional information on support of the password flow for a specific provider see the documentation for different providers. The password flow can be performed using only the command line. The credentials for the OpenID Provider have to be provided to oidc-gen. The credentials are only used to obtain the refresh token and are not stored. However, there are alternatives flows that do not reveal the user's credentials to oidc-agent.

Authorization Code Flow

The authorization code flow is the most widely used and is therefore supported by any OpenID Provider and does not reveal user credentials to oidc-agent. However, it requires a browser on the system running oidc-agent and oidc-gen. If you don't have a browser on that system or don't want to use it you can use the Device Flow, if supported by the provider. If the authorization code flow is the only flow supported by your provider and have to obtain a working account configuration on a machine that does not have a browser (e.g. a server), you can create the account configuration on another machine and copy / move the account configuration file to the server.
To use the Authorization Code Flow at least one redirect uri has to be provided ( see Redirect Uri). The redirect uri must be of the scheme http://localhost:<port>. It is recommend to use a port which is very unlikely to be used by any other application (during the account generation process). Additionally multiple redirect uris can be provided.
When starting the account generation process oidc-agent will try to open a webserver on the specified ports. If one port fails the next one is tried. After a successful startup oidc-gen will receive an authorization URI. When calling this URI the user has to authenticate against the OpenID Provider; afterwards the user is redirected to the previously provided redirect uri where the agent's webserver is waiting for the response. The agent receives an authorization code that is exchanged for the required token. oidc-gen is polling oidc-agent to get the generated account configuration and finally save it.

Device Flow

The device flow is a flow specifically for devices with limited input possibilities or without a web browser. Unfortunately, it is currently not supported by many OpenID Providers.
To use the device flow the user has to call oidc-gen with the --flow=device option. oidc-gen will print a verification url and an user code. If qrencode is installed on the system, the verification url is also printed as a QR-Code. The user must open the given url using a second device and enter the given user code. Through polling the agent will get a refresh token and oidc-gen the generated account configuration.
If the OpenID Provider does not provide the device authorization endpoint in their openid-configuration it has to provided manually using the --dae option. For help on a specific provider check the provider documentation

--manual

This option has to be used if a user wants to use a manually registered client. oidc-gen will then not use dynamic client registration. Additional metadata about the already registered client must be passed to oidc-gen when beeing prompted or using command line arguments (where they are available).

--no-scheme

This option can be used when the authorization code flow is performed. The --no-scheme option tells oidc-agent that a custom uri scheme should not be used for redirection. Normally a custom uri scheme can be used to redirect direct to (another) oidc-gen instance when performing the authorization code flow instead of using a web server. However, the redirect to oidc-gen requires a graphical desktop environment. If this is not present, redirection with custom uri schemes can be disabled with this option.
This option can be used with oidc-gen or oidc-agent. When using it with oidc-gen it will only disable custom uri schemes for that specific call; when using it with oidc-agent it will disable custom uri schemes for all calls to that oidc-agent instance.

--no-url-call

When using the authorization code flow the user must authenticate against the OpenID Provider using a webbrowser. To do this oidc-gen prints an authorization url the user has to open. On default this url is automatically opened in the default webbrowser (using xdg-open). One can disable this behavior with the --no-url-call option. When this option is passed oidc-gen will not automatically open the authorization url. The user then has to manually copy it to his webbrowser.

--no-webserver

This option can be used when the authorization code flow is performed. On default a small webserver is started by oidc-agent to be able to catch the redirect and complete the authorization code flow. The --no-webserver option tells oidc-agent that no webserver should be started. The authorization code flow can still be completed. Either by using a redirect uri that follows the custom redirect uri scheme edu.kit.data.oidc-agent:/<path> - this will directly redirect to oidc-gen, or by copying the url the browser would normally redirect to and pass it to oidc-gen --codeExchange.
This option can be used with oidc-gen or oidc-agent. When using it with oidc-gen it will only disable the webserver for that specific call; when using it with oidc-agent it will disable the webserver for all calls to that oidc-agent instance.

--oauth2

The --oauth or --oauth2 option can be used with providers that support OAuth2 but not OpenID Connect. This is mainly used so that the openid scope is not required.

--only-at

The --only-at option of oidc-gen can be used to obtain an access token without creating an account configuration. You still have to provide a valid client configuration. There are several ways of doing so. The option can be combined with the different ways of using oidc-gen, but it will not work with dynamic client registration. The following is a short overview:
  • oidc-gen --only-at -m Manually provide the needed information (with prompting)
  • oidc-gen --only-at -f <filepath> Manually provide the needed information by passing the path to a json file with the client information.
  • oidc-gen --only-at Use a public client defined in the pubclients.conf file.
Notes:
  • It's possible to overwrite some or all of the passed values with command line options.
  • You always have to provide the issuer url and the scopes to be used (but can do so in the passed file).
  • When using a public client that does not have a client secret you must pass the --pub option.
Here are three examples how a user can obtain the access token and store it in an environment variable without providing any other information:
1
export AT=`oidc-gen --only-at --iss=<issuer_url> --scope-max --prompt=none` # requires that a public client for <issuer_url> is listed in pubclients.conf
2
export AT=`oidc-gen --only-at --iss=<issuer_url> --client-id=<client_id> --client-secret=<client_secret> --redirect-url="http://localhost:8080" --scope=profile --prompt=none`
3
export AT=`oidc-gen --only-at -f<filepath> --prompt=none`
Copied!
In the last call <filepath> points to file with the following content:
1
{
2
"issuer_url": "https://example.com",
3
"client_id": "clientid",
4
"client_secret": "clientsecret",
5
"scope": "openid profile email",
6
"redirect_uris": [
7
"http://localhost:8080",
8
"http://localhost:34170",
9
"http://localhost:4242"
10
]
11
}
Copied!
Note that the --only-at option can be used with any flow.

--print

Using this option oidc-gen will read the specified file and print out the decrypted content. You can either pass an account shortname to print out the decrypted account configuration or an absolute filepath (needed if you want to decrypt client configuration files or other files encrypted by oidc-gen).

--prompt

This option can be used to change how oidc-gen prompts the user for information. There are different options available. Allowed values are cli, gui, and none. The default is cli. This is the normal mode as it also was before version 4.0.0. The suer is prompted for information on the command line. When selecting gui, oidc-gen will use graphical pop-up prompts. This requires oidc-agent-prompt to be installed. When none is selected, oidc-gen will not prompt for any information, which requires that the needed information is passed through command line options.
Changing the prompt mode to gui will also change the password prompt mode to gui (see --pw-prompt). Changing it to none, will not change the password prompt mode, because this cannot set to none.

--pub

When this option is provided, oidc-gen will use a public client. If --manual is not provided, normally a client would be registered dynamically. However, with the --pub option, a preregistered public client is used. Preregistered public clients are listed in /etc/oidc-agent/pubclients.config. If the --manual option is specified this allows usage of a public client that was registered manually (the client_secret parameter will be optional).
This option is also required to update an account configuration that uses a public client.

--pw-cmd

By default oidc-gen will prompt the user for an encryption password when it needs to encrypt or decrypt an account configuration. The option --pw-cmd can be used to provide a command that will print the needed encryption password to stdout. Then oidc-gen can obtain the password from that command instead of prompting the user.

--pw-env

By default oidc-gen will prompt the user for an encryption password when it needs to encrypt or decrypt an account configuration. The option --pw-env can be used to provide the encryption password via an environment variable. The name of the environment variable can be passed to --pw-env. If this option is used without an argument the encryption password is read from the environment variable OIDC_ENCRYPTION_PW.

--pw-file

By default oidc-gen will prompt the user for an encryption password when it needs to encrypt or decrypt an account configuration. The option --pw-file can be used to provide the path to a file that contains the needed encryption password. Then oidc-gen can obtain the password from that file.

--pw-gpg

The --pw-gpg, --pw-pgp, --gpg, or --pgp option can be used to indicate that PGP encryption utilizing gpg-agent should be used. The option takes a gpg key id and this key will be used for encryption. By using this approach one does not have to enter a password or pass it with one of the other --pw-* options whenever the file must be decrypted/encrypted. With PGP encryption, oidc-agent can utilize the gpg-agent for encryption. As long as the key is loaded in the gpg-agent, no password must be entered.
This approach is very useful with providers where the refresh tokens changes regularly, but it is also very practical for all other providers.

--pw-prompt

This option can be used to change how oidc-gen prompts the user for the encryption password. Possible values are cli and gui. The default is cli. gui requires oidc-agent-prompt to be installed.

--reauthenticate

This option can be used to update an existing account configuration file with a new refresh token. Useful if - for some reason - the refresh token is not valid anymore. One could also use --manual to update an existing account configuration; however if no other information has to be changed the --reauthenticate option is easier.

--rename

This option can be used to rename an existing account configuration file. It is not enough to simply rename the file in the file system. One could also use --manual to update an existing account configuration; however if no other information has to be changed the --rename option is easier.

--update

This option can be used to update the encryption and / or file format for a file generated by oidc-gen. It will decrypt and re-encrypt the file content, therefore updating encryption and file format to the newest version. This option can also be used to encrypt plain text files, e.g. a client configuration that was downloaded from the OpenID Provider - do not use it as a general file encryption tool. The passed parameter can be an absolute path or the name of a file placed in oidc-dir (e.g. an account configuration short name).

--at

The --at option is used during dynamic client registration. If the registration endpoint is protected and can only accessed with proper authentication, the user has to pass the token used for authentication to the --at option.

--aud

The --aud option can be used to set the audience of obtained access tokens. Protected resources should not accept a token if they are not listed as audience. Therefore, this is a mechanism to restrict the usage of an access token to certain resources.
The audience of individual access tokens can also be set with oidc-token --aud.
See oidc-token --aud for more information.

--client-id

The --client-id option can be used to set the client id that should be used.

--client-secret

The --client-secrete option can be used to set the client secret that should be used.

--cnid

The --cnid option can be used to set an additional client name identifier. This might be useful in the case a user has multiple machines that run oidc-agent and he configures new account configurations for each machine. However, they should have the same shortname on all machines. While this is possible, the clientname for all of these clients will be of the form oidc-agent:<shortname>. With the same shortname the clients cannot be distinguished easily in a web interface provided by the OpenID Provider. Most provider allow to access a list with authorized applications. If a user has an account configuration for example on two different machines, he will see the oidc-agent:example entry twice and cannot identify which entry belongs to which machine. However, this is possible using the --cnid option. This option allows the user to specify an additional component of the client name oidc-agent:<shortname>-<cnid>. A user could use for example the hostname of the machine. Then there are two different applications listed in the provider's web interface and the clients can be matched to the correct machine where that client is indeed used.

--configuration-endpoint

The --config-endpoint or --configuration-endpoint or --discovery-endpoint option can be used to manually set the endpoint where the provider publishes its metadata. Usually, this is a well-known location and does not need to be set. For providers that do not have a configuration endpoint this option is useful. In particular a uri of the form file:///path/to/file can be used to point to a local file where the required information is stored in the json format and according to the discovery specification. If the configuration endpoint is provided the issuer url is not required anymore - but it still can be provided.

--dae

The --dae option explicitly sets the device authorization endpoint uri. When performing the device flow oidc-agent has to send information to this endpoint. Usually oidc-agent can obtain this uri from the provider's configuration endpoint. However, if the provider does not publish its device authorization endpoint uri at its configuration endpoint, the user has to tell oidc-agent where the device authorization endpoint can be found. Therefore, the uri has to be passed to the --dae option. Check the documentation about providers for information if you need this option with your provider.

--issuer

The --issuer option can be used to set the issuer url that should be used.

--op-password

The --op-password option can be used to set the user's password at the OpenID provider. This option only applies when the password flow is used. Note that it is not recommended to use the password flow in general; even more it is not recommended to set the password from the command line. Please use prompting for this.

--op-username

The --op-username option can be used to set the user's username at the OpenID provider. This option only applies when the password flow is used.

--port

This option can be used to set redirect uris. Only the port must be provided and it will result in a redirect uri of the form http://localhost:<port>. This option is a short option for --redirect-uri (only the port has to be provided). Passing --port=1234 is equivalent to passing --redirect-uri=http://localhost:1234.
For more information see --redirect-uri.

--redirect-uri

This option can be used to set the redirect uri to be used. This applies to two cases:
  • When the client was manually registered, the option can be used to pass the registered redirect uris.
  • When the client will be registered dynamically, the option can be used to pass the redirect uris that should be registered.
On default oidc-agent will register multiple redirect uris when using dynamic client registration. One redirect uri that uses the custom uri scheme edu.kit.data.oidc-agent:/<path> and three redirect uris to localhost using different port numbers. Two of these port numbers are 4242 and 8080; the third port number will be chosen randomly. When starting the webserver oidc-agent will try all of these ports, stopping when the first succeeds. We cannot make any guarantees on the order in which these ports are tried.
This might be a problem in environments with restrictions to ports, e.g. containers. In such environments it's useful to use the --redirect-uri or --port option to manually set the port(s) that should be used (oidc-agent will register redirect uris with that port numbers). By using these options one can pass only ports that will be available in the restricted environment. Note that oidc-agent still makes no guarantees about the order in which these ports will be tried.

--rt

This option can be used to pass a refresh token that should be used. Because this will use the refresh flow this option implicitly sets --flow=refresh.
Note: Refresh tokens are bound to a specific client id. The provided refresh token must be issued for the provided client id.

--rt-env

Like --rt but reads the refresh token from an environment variable. The name of the environment variable can be passed to --rt-env. If this option is used without an argument the refresh token is read from the environment variable OIDC_REFRESH_TOKEN.

--scope

The --scope option can be used to set the scopes that should be used with this account configuration. Multiple scopes can be provided as a space separated list or by using the option multiple times. Pass max to use all available scopes for this provider.

--scope-all and --scope-max

The --scope-all and --scope-max options can be used to set the scopes that should be used with this account configuration to the maximum. I.e. this means that all scopes supported by the provider will be used. When using a public client all scopes available for that client will be used.