oidc-agent
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Detailed Information About All Options

--time

Using the --time option you can specify the minimum time (given in seconds) the access token should be valid. If this options is not given, it will be zero, therefore no guarantees about the validity of the token can be made, i.e. the access token might not be valid anymore even when used immediately. The agent will check if the cached token is still valid for the specified time and return it if that is the case. Otherwise a new access token is issued and returned. oidc-agent guarantees that the token will be valid the specified time, if it is below the provider's maximum, otherwise it will be the provider's maximum (i.e. if --time=3600 is used, but for that provider access tokens are only valid for 5 minutes, the returned token will be valid for those 5 minutes).

Information Available from oidc-token

On default oidc-token prints the requested access token to stdout. But oidc-token can provide more information, like the issuer url of the issuer for which the access token is valid. This information might be required by other applications, so that they know where the token has to be used. Additionally the time when the token expires (as the number of seconds since the Epoch, 1970-01-01 00:00:00 +0000 (UTC)) can also be returned. This enables an application to cache the token for the time it is valid.
There are multiple ways to obtain all of this information or only a subset using oidc-token: In the following we will describe different command line options that can be used to control the returned information. For additional examples refer to Tips.
  • Use the -a option to get all information: oidc-token will print all information to stdout. One piece of information per line:
  • Use environment variables: Using the -c option oidc-token will print out shell commands that can be evaluated to set environment variables (name of the environment variables are defaults):
    eval `oidc-token <short_name> -c` will automatically set these variables. Using the -o, -i, and -e option the name of the exported variables can be customized.

--all

To get all information available and print it to stdout use the --all option. Each line contains one piece of information:
  • First line: access token
  • Second line: issuer url
  • Third line: expiration time
This way it is easy to parse on the command line or by other applications. However, on the command line you might prefer the usage of environment variables (--env).

--env

Instead of printing all information directly to stdout the --env option prints out shell commands that will put all information into environment variables. Therefore, it can be used to easily make all information available in the current terminal: eval `oidc-token -c <shortname>`
The names of the used environment variables are as followed:
  • OIDC_AT: access token
  • OIDC_ISS: issuer url
  • OIDC_EXP: expiration time
The name of the environment variables can be changed with the --expires-at, --issuer, and --token options.

--expires-at

The --expires-at option can be used to request the time when the access token expires (given in the number of seconds since the Epoch, 1970-01-01 00:00:00 +0000 (UTC)). It optionally takes the name of an environment variable as an argument. If this argument is not passed and non of the --issuer and --token options are passed, the expiration time is printed to stdout. Otherwise shell commands are printed that will export the value into an environment variable. The name of this variable can be set with the passed argument and defaults to OIDC_EXP.
Examples:
oidc-token <shortname> -e # prints the expiration time
eval `oidc-token <shortname> -oe` # puts the access token and expiration time into OIDC_AT and OIDC_EXP, resp.
eval `oidc-token <shortname> -e AT_EXP` # puts the expiration time into AT_EXP

--issuer

The --issuer option can be used to request the issuer url of the issuer that issued the access token. It optionally takes the name of an environment variable as an argument. If this argument is not passed and non of the --expires-at and --token options are passed, the issuer url is printed to stdout. Otherwise shell commands are printed that will export the value into an environment variable. The name of this variable can be set with the passed argument and defaults to OIDC_ISS.
Examples:
oidc-token <shortname> -i # prints the issuer url
eval `oidc-token <shortname> -oi` # puts the access token and issuer url into OIDC_AT and OIDC_ISS, resp.
eval `oidc-token <shortname> -i ISSUER` # puts the issuer url into ISSUER

--token

The --token option can be used to request the access token. It optionally takes the name of an environment variable as an argument. If this argument is not passed and non of the --expires-at and --token options are passed, the access token is printed to stdout (same as when no options are provided). Otherwise shell commands are printed that will export the value into an environment variable. The name of this variable can be set with the passed argument and defaults to OIDC_AT.
Examples:
eval `oidc-token <shortname> -oi` # puts the access token and issuer url into OIDC_AT and OIDC_ISS, resp.
eval `oidc-token <shortname> -o TOKEN` # puts the issuer url into TOKEN

--force-new

The --force-new option can be used to force oidc-agent to return a new access token. This will return an access token that will be valid as long as possible and it substitutes the cached access token.

--aud

The --aud option can be used to request an access token with the specified audience. Protected resources should not accept a token if they are not listed as audience. Therefore, this is a mechanism to restrict the usage of an access token to certain resources.
Note that the format of providing multiple audiences might be different for different providers, since this parameter is currently not widely supported by providers and a clear standard is not yet established. We currently only know about one provider that supports this parameter (IAM); there multiple audiences can be requested as a space separated string.
Example:
oidc-token <shortname> --aud="foo bar"

--id-token

The --id-token option can be used to request an id token instead of an access token. Note that id tokens should not be passed to other applications as authorization. This option is only mend as a toll for development, it should not be used by other applications. Therefore, this option requires user approval, unless the account configuration was loaded with oidc-add --always-allow-idtoken or the --always-allow-idtoken option was specific on agent startup.

--scope

The --scope option can be used to specify the scopes of the requested token. The returned access token will only be valid for these scope values. Multiple scopes can be provided as a space separated list or by using the option multiple times. All passed scope values have to be registered for this client (and refresh token); upscoping is therefore not possible.
Example:
oidc-token <shortname> -s openid -s profile
If this option is omitted the default scope is used.

--name

The --name option is intended for other applications and scripts that call oidc-token to obtain an access token. The option sets the passed name as the application name that requests the access token. This name might be displayed to the user, e.g. when the account first has to be loaded. Setting the correct application name allows the user to decide on correct information.
Example:
oidc-token <shortname> --name="My custom script"